Quotations – The British press and elite in praise of Hitler

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“’Hitler – if I read him rightly – is neither an insincere man nor a conscious demagogue.”
Gordon Beckles
in The Daily Herald,
31 January 1933, p. 8.
“Hitler’s appointment is on the whole a good and necessary thing. It has become steadily more evident of late that until herr Hitler had been given a fair trial every other possible German government was hopelessly handicapped.”
Editorial,
The News Chronicle, and cited in
‘Today’s Opinions,’ The Northern Daily Mail,
31 January 1933, p. 4.

‘That Herr Hitler, who leads the strongest party in the Reichstag and obtained almost a third of more than 35,000,000 votes in the last election, should be given the chance of showing that he is something more than an orator and an agitator was always desirable.’ Editorial ‘Her Hitler in Office,’ The Times, 31 January 1933, p. 11.

“’That Herr Hitler, who leads the strongest party in the Reichstag and obtained almost a third of more than 35,000,000 votes in the last election, should be given the chance of showing that he is something more than an orator and an agitator was always desirable.’
Editorial, ‘Her Hitler in Office,’
The Times,
31 January 1933 p. 11.
“A friend who has had several interviews with Herr Hitler, the new German Chancellor, and on one occasion lunched with him at a cafe in Munich ( says a Daily Telegraph gossip ) was greatly struck by the fact that he appears in public there nearly every day for meals, without any great precautions being taken for his safety. Herr Hitler who speaks little or no English, talked during the whole of the luncheon on the subject of history – he has a very vivid historical imagination and a definite flair for the subject – and in particular about Cromwell… My friend summed up his impressions of him with the words, ‘What struck me most was that a man who looks so uninspiring in his photographs, with that ridiculous little moustache, should in the flesh be so personally attractive and so impressive.’”
The Daily Telegraph cited in
‘Germany’s New Chancellor,’
The Yorkshire Evening Post,
31 January 1933, p. 8.
“While various fears are being expressed in some quarters, it is felt by those who have closely studied German politics that until Hitler has been given a fair trial every other possible German government was hopelessly handicapped. The more hopeful view now prevailing is that President Hindenburg’s repeated call for unity seems at last to have been answered, and the chances are now more favourable than they have been for years of a steady government.”
Editorial,
The Lancashire Evening Post,
31 January 1933, p. 4.
“Since in recent years, he has forged his way to the front in German politics, Hitler has been likened to… Rasputin, but without the “mystic monk’s” degenerate viciousness.”
‘Hitler’s Rise from Builder’s Labourer to Chancellor,’
The Birmingham Daily Gazette,
31 January 1933, p. 3.
“All things considered, in most countries Hitler will be wished luck. His broadcast statement of policy yesterday may contain a faint challenge to France, and there may be glimpses of the old mail-fisted Fritz in it – but these aspects are no more than natural.”
Marxism for Misery,
‘The Aberdeen Press and Journal,
2 February 1933, p. 6.
“He (Hitler) is a passionate patriot, demanding redress of France for the ruthless invasion of her black troops on German soil during the years of occupation. “Let us see if African niggers can conquer a free Germany,” he cries. In this matter he has universal support throughout Germany; the French coloured troops on the Rhine and in the Ruhr behaved disgracefully to everything German, especially the girls and the women. France has only herself to blame for the hatred of Hitler and his millions of followers.”
‘Passionate Patriot,’
The Edinburgh Evening News,
3 February 1933, p. 8.
“This remarkable young man of forty three can justly enjoy his triumph. He has known Germany from inside for only twenty years. His experience of her politics is considerably less. Solely by his own inherent qualities – courage, initiative, energy, ability and enthusiasm – he has created in a few years the most powerful party in the State and gained the passionate admiration of half the youth of Germany.”
‘The Slump-Proof Industry,’
The Sphere,
4 February 1933, p. 141.
“His (Hitler’s) fixed idea is not to become a dictator, but to lead Germany out of the mire… He is as capable of reasonableness and fairness as other statesmen, and if he will not have peace without honour he is only following a traditional motto of statesmanship… You have but to look at his nervous hands, which say almost as much as his voice, to realise he is a man of action – not the strong, silent man of tradition, but a dynamic personality, driven by an intense love of Germany.”
Carel Hautman, ‘You Must not Laugh in Hitler’s Face,’
The Aberdeen Press and Journal,
8 February 1933, p. 6.

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